Posts Tagged ‘biology’

This past spring, Mat Hoffman told the story of how in 1999, he tore his ACL underwent surgery without anesthesia to receive a synthetic ligament.  Because the LARS™ ligament was banned in the U.S., he had to go to Canada.  The video, illustrated by Taj Mihelic, described why there was no anesthesia and what made it so revolutionary for him.  It piqued my interest in the LARS™ ligament so I did a little digging about its history and current studies.

The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System, or LARS™, was developed in 1992 with hopes of solving problems with synthetic ligaments in the past decade (Corin).  Those often failed or caused inflammation in the synovial membrane that lines the joints (Machotka et al. 2010).  The LARS™ ligament was made from terephthalic polyethylene polyester fibers that are twisted for increased durability.

1595 From Corin

When Mat received his LARS™ ligament, the procedure was still relatively new.  It made headlines in Australia around 2010, as more professional athletes got LARS™ ligaments and enjoyed the speedy recovery.  That’s not to say there weren’t critics. Moreover, the FDA has yet to approve it.

Reviews of clinical studies thus far lean towards positive outcomes. Batty et al. and Chen at al. have compared the efficacy of many types of synthetic ligaments, and the LARS ligament produced the lowest rate of failure. The results reinforces the idea that this could be a solution to the severe side effects experienced with its predecessors. One issue appears to be the long-term durability. A study by Tiefenboeck et al. published this year examined patients who had their ACL reconstructed with the ligament with at least a ten-year follow-up reveals that re-rupturing does occur. They do not recommend the LARS™ ligament for primary ACL reconstruction. This is, however, just one study. As more results are published and more patients are observed in the long run, a better idea of the uses and limitations of the LARS™ ligament will be known. In Mat’s case, it appears to be a great success.

References

  • Batty LM, Norsworthy CJ, Lash NJ, Wasiak J, Richmond AK, Feller JA. 2015. Synthetic devices for reconstructive surgery of the cruciate ligaments: a systematic review. Arthroscopy. 31(5):957-68.
  • Chen J, Xu J, Wang A, Zheng M. 2009 Scaffolds for tendon and ligament repair: review of the efficacy of commercial products. Expert Review of Medical Devices. 6(1):61-73.
  • Corin – “LARS™ (Medical professionals)”
  • Machotka Z, Scarborough I, Duncan W, Kumar S, Perraton L. 2010. Anterior cruciate ligament repair with LARS (ligament advanced reinforcement system): a systematic review. Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology. 2:29.
  • Tiefenboeck TM, Thurmaier E, Tiefenboeck MM, Ostermann RC, Joestl J, Winnisch M, Schurz M, Hajdu S, Hofbauer M. 2015. Clinical and functional outcome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the LARS™ system at a minimum follow-up of 10years. Knee. pii: S0968-0160(15)00131-3.
Advertisements

It’s been a while since I’ve come across random action sports posts on my Facebook feed, but these are two interesting stories that make up for the huge break I took since my last Facebook Findings post.  The first comes from  my tattooed burlesque dancer friend Honey Hula-la.  She linked an article about a DIY tattoo parlor in Colorado run by skater Jesse Brocado called No Class.  I’m not going to share the VICE article because I have issues with that magazine and their bigotry.  Instead I’ll link to Peter Garritano’s photos of No Class tattoos and skaters.  I don’t approve of what No Class does mainly because they admit to not sterilizing and the drunkenness plus lack of experience can do a lot of damage.  However, in today’s world of consumerism, we could use some hardcore DIY.

My friend Canon recently promoted the second finding, a video fro the project “Through the Surface”.  Created by Clinton Edward and Clifford Kapono, the project mixes surfing, science, and saving the ocean.  They’ve submitted it on National Geographic’s Expedition Granted competition.  I’m passionate about conservation and science education (and of course, action sports) so you can bet that they’ve got my vote.  Click here to vote. You can do so everyday until September 29.

I had quite a few gripes about both the U.S. and Canadian coverage of Olympic snowboarding and freeskiing (and apparently my friends did as well).  It highlighted the inequality that’s rampant in both action sports and media, but that’s a post for another day.  Right now I want to focus on one of the good things that came out of this: the increased opportunity to explore the science behind skiing and snowboarding.  This is a great way to get action sports fans interested in science and scientists interested in action sports.

NBC paired with the National Science Foundation to create a series videos exploring the Science and Engineering of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games.  They’d done a similar series in 2010, but now they have gone past just a cursory coverage of sports, looking at halfpipe engineering and snow.  There’s also the addition of slopestyle skiing.

If you’re subscribed to The New York Times, you can get access to their interactive stories, which break down gold medal-winning runs and the keys to success.  They’re definitely worth checking out just for the composite photography.  Those without a subscription can catch some of the videos on Hulu.

The blog Physics Buzz did a podcast about snowboarding.  They explained the triple cork better than I ever did, and there’s a link to a post that breaks down the physics of one.

We can’t forget about the Paralympians, especially with the debut of boardcross this year.   Live Science shared an article about the technology that helps these athletes do things their able-bodied peers can do.  I want to take this time to congratulate Evan Strong for grabbing the first U.S. Paralympic gold in Sochi, being a part of the American sweep in men’s boardercross with Michael Shea and Keith Gabel, and making his way onto an upcoming Wheaties box:

Wheaties/Evan Strong

Finally, I came across a surprising mention to snowboarding while listening to the linguistic podcast, A Way with Words.  The term “wind down the windows” caught the attention of host Martha Barnette because it’s becoming a rather dated image (I remember winding down the windows in my dad’s old pick-up as a little kid).  It’s been pretty cool seeing and hearing snowboarding and freeskiing pop up in the most unexpected places.