Posts Tagged ‘traumatic brain injury’

I’ve been listening to The Monday M.A.S.S. podcast, and in a recent episode, the hosts Chris Coté and Todd Richards discussed the mandatory helmet rule for under-18 competitors in Olympics-sanctioned park and street skateboarding events.   Based on what I saw in the X Games Shanghai replays, X Games doesn’t have such a rule.  World Skate, however, does, and last year, Jagger Eaton was disqualified as a result of the head of delegation of the Brazilian Federation of Skateboarding filing a complaint.

There’s a lot to unpack with that particular incident, especially as Jagger’s DQ allowed Brailian skater Murilo Peres to advance to the finals.  The idea of filing complaints fuels the criticisms of skateboarding’s inclusion into the Olympics.  There’s bureaucracy, regulation, and competitivenessthings directly in opposition to skating’s free-wheeling, anti-establishment rules.  I’m not sure the complaint was filed out of concern for Jagger’s safety but rather a seizing of the opportunity to advance.  Not exactly cool.

However, safety is something to consider.  The brain is still developing in adolescents, and although helmets don’t prevent brain injury, they at least protect the skull, which in turn protects the brain and also doesn’t finish growing until adulthood.  Last year, a pilot study was published in Frontiers in Neurology that revealed adolescent mice with a mild brain injury don’t suffer worse effects from a subsequent injury.  Their skulls do get changed, which could be a means of protection from future injuries or a consequence of development being altered.  There isn’t a clear answer, and this is just one study.  Also, note that they specified “mild” TBI.

Skateboarding is going to reach a broader audience with the Olympics.  Not everyone is going to have someone to teach them how to fall properly or access to skateparks where you don’t have to worry about cars and random obstacles (I mean, I used the back of the couch as a balance beam after watching gymnasts in the 1996 Olympics).  It’s better for the competitive skaters to set an example for young kids whose development may be impacted by injuries to the skull and brain until we obtain more information the consequences of early TBI.

References
McColl, Thomas J et al. “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Adolescent Mice Alters Skull Bone Properties to Influence a Subsequent Brain Impact at Adulthood: A Pilot Study.” Frontiers in neurology vol. 9 372. 25 May. 2018, doi:10.3389/fneur.2018.00372